May Series…Hot Topics in Children’s Mental Health

If kids and teens affected by mental illness and their families are to be successfully welcomed and fully included in our churches, the church will need to make great strides in its’ understanding of mental illness. That’s where I hope we can help.

May is designated as National Mental Health Month, and the week of May 6-12 is officially designated as Children’s Mental Health Awareness Week. In order to promote better understanding of common mental disorders in children and teens and the challenges faced their families, we’ll spend the month looking in depth at some of the more controversial topics in the field of child and adolescent mental health.

I’m not saying we’ll be able to cover all of these topics, but some ideas under consideration include…

How much influence does the pharmaceutical industry have with the physicians who treat kids for mental illness?

Are there effective homeopathic treatments for mental illness in children and teens?

Do antidepressants increase suicidal behavior in youth?

How do insurance companies/managed care impact the mental health treatment received  by children and teens?

What legitimate safety concerns exist regarding the use of psychotropic medication in children and teens?

What do we know about the relationship between trauma and mental illness in kids?

How does our educational system contribute to the increased prevalence of mental illness in kids?

Does psychotherapy work for kids? If so, when?

Why is it so hard to find good Christian mental health services for kids?

Are the increased rates of mental illness reported in kids legitimate?

When should a parent search for a new psychiatrist, psychologist or counselor for their child?

What would YOU like us to talk about? Leave your suggestions below in the Comments section. We’ll try to get to as many requests as possible in our May series…that could easily extend into the summer.

Key Ministry will be offering free, day-long JAM (Jumpstart All-Inclusive Ministry) Sessions at Two Rivers Church in Knoxville, TN on Saturday, April 28th and at Center Pointe Christian Church in Cincinnati, OH on Saturday, May 12th. Click here to register for either JAM Session!

About Dr. G

Dr. Stephen Grcevich serves as President and Founder of Key Ministry, a non-profit organization providing free training, consultation, resources and support to help churches serve families of children with disabilities. Dr. Grcevich is a graduate of Northeastern Ohio Medical University (NEOMED), trained in General Psychiatry at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation and in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at University Hospitals of Cleveland/Case Western Reserve University. He is a faculty member in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at two medical schools, leads a group practice in suburban Cleveland (Family Center by the Falls), and continues to be involved in research evaluating the safety and effectiveness of medications prescribed to children for ADHD, anxiety and depression. He is a past recipient of the Exemplary Psychiatrist Award from the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). Dr. Grcevich was recently recognized by Sharecare as one of the top ten online influencers in children’s mental health. His blog for Key Ministry, www.church4everychild.org was ranked fourth among the top 100 children's ministry blogs in 2015 by Ministry to Children.
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One Response to May Series…Hot Topics in Children’s Mental Health

  1. Ann Holmes says:

    Rats! I typed a thoughtful reply and now my thoughts are gone! Go for them all!!! If not, effective homeopathic remedies, legitimate safety concerns regarding psychotropic medication in children and teens, relationship between trauma and mental illness in kids, our educational system’s contribution to the increased prevalence of mental illness in kids, Does psychotherapy work for kids? If so, when?, Why is it so hard to find good Christian mental health services for kids?,
    When should a parent search for a new psychiatrist, psychologist or counselor for their child?
    This last one is a BIG one – at least in our experience as pastor and wife. You could also include a rubric for how to look for a new doc and what to look for.

    Like

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